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Low on your B6 vitamins?

Our B vitamins are used and depleted on a daily basis, and … STRESS is the main culprit.

  • So how do you know if you are low on your B vitamins?
  • Are you tired? How are you sleeping?
  • How are your nerves?

Today we are going to cover Vitamin B6 and how it is essential for our nervous system, liver, brain, muscles, and much, much more.

Adrenal exhaustion (fatigue), week muscles, nervousness, leg cramps, insomnia, burning feet/hands, and depression are all possible signs that you may have a deficiency of Vitamin B6. Vitamin B6 keeps our nerves young, balances the sodium levels in our bodies, and helps our bodies to metabolize fat, protein, and carbs.

Find out more about how important Vitamin B6 is to our bodies, and the foods that are high in this much needed nutrient.

VITAMIN B6

(Pyridoxin)

Vitamin B6 is necessary for metabolism of nutrients. It aids in formation of antibodies and helps maintain balance of sodium and phosphorus in the body. It is also needed for the synthesis of RNA and DNA. Its Properties are Adrenergic, Diuretic, Nervine, Nutritive and Serotonergic. The bodies Systems are Affected are the Brain, Dopamine, Female Reproductive System, Liver, Mucus Membranes, Muscles, and Nerves.

Possible Signs of Deficiency:

Adrenal exhaustion (stress disease)

Anemia

Arteriosclerosis

Dermatitis

Dizziness

Epileptic-type convulsions in children

Fainting easily

Inflammation of the lips

Insomnia

Insulin (oversensitivity)

Morning sickness (kidneys eliminate)

Motion sickness

Mouth problems

Nausea / Vomiting

Nervousness

Skin disease

Tremors

Weak muscles

Clinical Uses of Nutrient:

Acne

Anxiety

Arthritis

Autism

¹Birth Control (countering side effects)

Breasts (swelling / tenderness)

Burning Feet / Hands

Dandruff

Depression

Diabetes

Edema

Fatigue

Hemochromatosis

Leg Cramps
Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (O.C.D.)P.M.S. (general)²P.M.S. Types A, C, D, H Pregnancy (herbs / supplements)PsoriasisSore or Geographic TongueTooth decayStretch marks – with the use of Zinc

Bell’s Palsy

St. Vitus Dance

Epileptic seizures

Nerve compression injuries (Carpel Tunnel)

Uses of Nutrient in the Body:

  • Keeps nerves young
  • Helps utilize fats
  • Helps in forming of blood
  • Brings about harmonious operation of the muscles
  • Encourages proper function of oil glands
  • Improves tolerance to noise
  • Influences hair color, growth, and texture

*Properties: Adrenergic, Diuretic, Nervine, Nutritive, and Serotonergic

 

Conditions Controlled by Vitamin B6

  • Carbohydrate, fat, and protein metabolism
  • Balance of Sodium & Phosphorus
  • Formation of Blood Antibodies

 

Foods High in Nutrient:

Avocado

Bananas

Beef

Beets

Brewer’s Yeast

Broccoli

Brown rice

Chicken

Cod

Dates

Egg yolk

Honey

Liver

Molasses

Nuts (Brazil, chestnuts)

Nut / Grain oils

Organ meats

Raw green leafy vegetables

Salmon

Seeds

Tuna

Wheat bran and germ

Whole grains

 

*Stability: 50% destroyed by overcooking, oversoaking, or over washing. Consume the cooking water to preserve benefits.

*Storage: Excreted within 8 hours.

Herbs:

  • Alfalfa
  • Capsicum
  • Catnip
  • Kelp
  • Red Clover
  • Papaya

 

RDA

(Recommended Daily Allowance)

MenWomen
1.8 mg1.5 mg
OR: 0.2 mg per 100 mg of protein

 

Other Considerations: Vitamin B6 has been found to be effective in protecting people with sun-sensitivity and helps to alleviate air, sea and motion sickness. It also regulates fluid production in the body.

Warnings: Vitamin B6 is the only water-soluble vitamin and if taken in high doses over time may be toxic, resulting in numbness and tingling in the extremities. Taking antidepressants, ¹oral contraceptives, and estrogen may increase the need of more Vitamin B6.

References:

¹Birth control may decrease Vitamin B6 in the body.

²See “The Comprehensive Guide To Nature’s Sunshine Products”. (available in store)

 

Kristine Devillier, RND                     www.natureslinkwellness.com / Nature’s Link Wellness Center

 

 

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Author Info

Kristine Devillier